ABOUT

CIPC believes that our nation’s immigration policies should reflect our country’s core values of fairness and respect for work. Immigration law should protect all workers’ labor and civil rights, uphold labor and employment standards for all, and restrict, rather than build on, a burdensome “employer sanctions framework.” CIPC works to support local campaigns and workers, as well as advance policies that protect immigrant workers.

Oakland, CAA nurse draws blankets around a patient at Summit Medical Center.Document Abuse

Document abuse occurs when an employer does not permit a worker to use documents that are legally acceptable under the I-9 form but, instead, specifies which documents he or she must use, or requests more documents than are required by the I-9 form.

This year, CIPC and MALDEF are co-sponsoring SB 1001 (Mitchell) to address the issue of document abuse in California. This bill would prohibit an employer from requiring additional or other documents that are already required under the I-9 process – a practice known as document abuse. This bill would create a state remedy for this unfair labor practice that targets immigrant workers.

Flower PickersE-Verify: A Threat to All Workers

E-Verify is a flawed, costly web-based program that lets U.S. businesses verify the work authorization of new hires. Right now, it’s optional for most employers.

Did you know that if E-Verify were forced on all California businesses, errors in the database would kill the jobs of 90,000 work-authorized Californians?

And many undocumented workers who are a crucial part of our economy would be forced deeper into the shadows.

Mountain  View, CASilicon Valley electronics worker.Taking Action in California 

CIPC co-sponsored the Employment Acceleration Act with MALDEF in 2011. Signed by Governor Brown, the law ensures that city, county and state government cannot force private business owners to use E-Verify.

In 2015, CIPC co-sponsored AB 622 (Hernandez) with MALDEF which limits the abuse of E-Verify and creates a financial civil penalty for employers who commit the most egregious violations. Signed by Governor Brown in 2015, the law went into effect January 1, 2016 and works to further protect all workers in California from the harmful E-Verify program.

Photos above by David Bacon